Phoenix solves guard problems with Alolino, Javelona

first_imgBrad Pitt wins his first acting Oscar as awards get underway Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH PH among economies most vulnerable to virus “Once na narinig ko yung name ko, I had a sigh of relief talaga,” Alolino said after Phoenix drafted him second in the regular draft.“Lahat ng pinaghirapan ko was worth it because nandito na ako. It really is a dream come true.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentAlolino pairs with Matthew Wright as the standout rookies which will join the Fuel Masters this upcoming season.And for Phoenix coach Ariel Vanguardia, those picks allowed him to address his squad’s pressing need beef up its backcourt. “May familiarity na kami sa isa’t isa. Hindi ko in-expect yun pero hopefully, sama-sama din kami na makapag-sign ng contract.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next “We solved our point guard problem,” he said. “We got lots of point guards now.”Alolino joins sophomore slasher Simon Enciso and veteran Chico Lanete at the point. And this early, Alolino is excited to have the chance to be mentored by those two.“I’m really excited to learn more. Di ako magre-relax at ibibigay ko pa kung ano kaya ko,” he said.Alolino is also hoping that he won’t have a hard time adjusting to the PBA game given that he will open a new chapter in his basketball career along with his former NU teammates Jeff Javillonar and Pao Javelona, who were also acquired by Phoenix in the draft.“Happy ako na at least nandito na kami. Nakasama ko sila ng maraming beses na sa UAAP pero pare-parehas kaming bago dito kaya as much as possible, hahanapin pa namin yung mabibigay namin sa team,” he said, as he hopes to exploit this advantage as all three Bulldogs eye to crack Vanguardia’s rotation through their chemistry.ADVERTISEMENT Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netConsider it a dream come true for Gelo Alolino.The former National University guard didn’t really have to wait that long before he heard his name called up in the stage in the 2016 PBA Rookie Draft on Sunday.ADVERTISEMENT Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports We are young Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Lee excited to team up with Star rookie Jalaloncenter_img 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas MOST READ Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise View comments Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine EDITORS’ PICK Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles03:59Duterte’s drug war barely nicked surface of society’s menace – Robredo01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUNDlast_img read more

Zimbabwe’s chiefs revive tradition to save the country’s last pangolins

first_imgBiodiversity, Community-based Conservation, Conservation, Environment, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Governance, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, NGOs Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Rebecca Kesslercenter_img Asian pangolins are fast dwindling for the illegal international trade, and traffickers are now targeting African pangolins for new supply, raising fears in Zimbabwe that they could wipe out the country’s last pangolins.However, traditional leaders, with the support of the Zimbabwean government, are playing a strong role in protecting the country’s remaining pangolins.They are reminding their communities of age-old myths and beliefs about pangolins, as well as imposing heavy fines on those who harm them, to instill a sense of collective responsibility among the people. ZIMUNYA COMMUNAL LAND, Zimbabwe — Christopher Zimunya, a 72-year-old leader of the indigenous VaJindwi people in eastern Zimbabwe, beamed as he spoke about pangolins. Sitting on the veranda of his small, thriving convenience shop at 22 Miles Business Centre, Zimunya told Mongabay that pangolins are revered in this part of the country, an area known as Zimunya communal land.“Pangolins are sacred here and we guard them jealously,” he said with a smile. “These animals are really beautiful and finding one brings a lot of good luck to the person who finds it and it’s a taboo to kill it.”Asian stocks of the scaly mammals are fast dwindling for the illegal international trade. Traffickers are now targeting African pangolins for new supply, raising fears in Zimbabwe that they could wipe out the country’s last pangolins. However, traditional leaders, with the support of the Zimbabwean government, are taking a strong role in protecting the country’s remaining pangolins. They are reminding their communities of age-old myths and beliefs about pangolins, as well as imposing heavy fines on those who harm them, to instill a sense of collective responsibility among the people.Christopher Zimunya, a traditional leader of VaJindwi people in eastern Zimbabwe, explains the importance of pangolins. Image by Andrew Mambondiyani for Mongabay.Scaly and endangeredPangolins are sought after in China and Vietnam, where the meat is considered a delicacy and the scales are used in traditional medicines for various ailments (although there is no evidence of their efficacy). In 2014, the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) warned that more than a million pangolins had been taken from the wild in the preceding 10 years, putting the animals at risk of extinction. All eight species are effectively banned from international trade under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Fauna and Flora (CITES), but the trade persists illegally nevertheless. Of the four Asian species, two are now listed as critically endangered and two as endangered. The four African species are listed as vulnerable.Zimbabwe has one the strictest laws against pangolin poaching in Africa. The animals are specially protected under the country’s Parks and Wildlife Act, and illegally possessing or dealing in them attracts a prison sentence of up to 12 years, according to Zimbabwe’s Parks and Wildlife Management Authority. In 2015, authorities arrested 84 pangolin poachers in Zimbabwe and sentenced 47 to nine years in prison, the mandatory minimum sentence, according to the Tikki Hywood Foundation. The next year the number of poachers arrested shot up to 114; 52 received nine-year sentences.Trevor Saruwaka, the legislator for Zimbabwe’s Mutasa South constituency, which includes a chiefdom near Zimunya called Mutasa communal land, told Mongabay that many people were unaware of the gravity of pangolin poaching and the severe sentence it carried.“Many are shocked when they appear in court and [are] sentenced to nine years,” Saruwaka said. “The information about the seriousness of the crime is not reaching many people in rural areas and there is [a] need to use government structures everywhere to educate people about [the] seriousness of pangolin poaching.”A pangolin pup rescued from trafficking. Image courtesy of the Tikki Hywood Foundation.Pangolins in traditional beliefIn Zimunya communal land and elsewhere, local chiefs are using traditional beliefs about pangolins to try to fill that educational gap and deter poaching.Sandwiched between Mozambique to the east and Zimbabwe’s Marange communal area in the west, Zimunya communal land is occupied primarily by the VaJindwi. Along the eastern part of this chiefdom in Manicaland province is a treacherous mountain range that forms part of the country’s Eastern Highlands.People here subsist mainly on small-scale crop and livestock farming, selling their surplus produce in the city of Mutare. Poverty is entrenched and worsening as climate change makes farming increasingly unpredictable and difficult.Many people here still adhere to traditional VaJindwi beliefs and practices. They conduct rainmaking ceremonies at the onset of the wet season. Many believe that mystical lions and birds protect the area from evil spirits. They safeguard certain tree species where protective deities are thought to reside, imposing big fines on anyone found cutting them down.Pangolins fit into that belief system, both in Zimunya and elsewhere in Zimbabwe. The animals, known in the local Jindwi dialect as harakabvuka, are extremely rare, shy and mostly nocturnal. Many people in this region have never seen a pangolin, heightening the mythical quality of this reclusive animal. In fact, they use the word harakabvuka to refer to something very rare.Small-scale farming is the source of livelihood for many people in Zimunya communal land. Image by Andrew Mambondiyani for Mongabay.“If a person finds a pangolin walking by, it means a lot of good luck. And the number of steps the pangolin takes before it disappears means the number of good years that person is going to live,” Zimunya said. Conversely, harming a pangolin is thought to bring bad luck. “Here we don’t fathom or imagine a person killing a pangolin, worse still selling it. It’s a taboo,” he said.Years back, Zimunya said, when a person found a pangolin, he or she was required to hand it over to the chief, who would then release it back into the forest. “Our forefathers protected these animals; no wonder we still have them today and we must do likewise,” he said.Under customary law, he said, if a person is caught killing or selling a pangolin, the chief would fine the poacher a cow and a sheep — a heavy fine by rural standards— and turn him or her over to the national police.“To us a pangolin is more than just an animal; it is part of our culture. We teach our children to value the pangolin and never to kill or sell it,” Zimunya said. “We still have many pangolins living in all these mountains surrounding us but they are rarely seen and we pray they should be left where they are.”The pangolin’s thick overlapping scales protect it from predators such as lions, but the animal is an easy mark for illegal wildlife traffickers. Image courtesy of the Tikki Hywood Foundation.Chiefs try to stem the poachingZimunya said the system was so far withstanding the rising pressure to poach pangolins: people young and old alike are actively involved in pangolin conservation and report any acts of poaching to the police or traditional leaders, he said, adding that there had been no local arrests so far.Other residents echoed Zimunya’s observations.“If you poach a pangolin here in Zimunya and try to sell it you will definitely be caught because the animal can’t be sold according to our culture. It brings bad luck to anyone who tries to make money from it,” Elijah Ngwarati, a 43-year-old farmer, told Mongabay with a chuckle.Elijah Ngwarati, a resident of Zimunya communal land, eastern Zimbabwe. Image by Andrew Mambondiyani for Mongabay.At a local business center, 38-year-old Leonard Madanhire weighed in, saying it would be difficult for traffickers to recruit locals to poach pangolins because of the respect people have for the animals. Some of the poachers, mostly from China, were offering up to $10,000 for a pangolin, dead or alive, he’d heard. “Yes, it’s a lot of money, but many people are not falling for the money,” he said.Albert Mutasa, a village elder in his seventies who was drinking beer with friends at the business center, said it was important for the elders to teach their children traditional ways to protect wildlife in the area.“We need to teach our children to protect our wild animals and plants. It is our duty as elders to teach the younger generation,” he said.Christopher Zimunya said the VaJindwi of Zimunya communal land weren’t the only indigenous group using traditional reverence for the pangolin to combat poaching. Chiefs in nearby Marange communal land and Mutasa communal land, as well as many others in Zimbabwe are doing the same, he said.The chiefs’ role in pangolin protection has drawn some attention from the broader conservation community.“We are working with the authorities; the chiefs, the police, the judiciary and [rural district] council officials, and they are very proactive in pangolin conservation,” said Hywood of the Tikki Hywood Foundation, which works to raise public awareness and train police and court officials about the pangolin trafficking problem, in addition to rehabilitating trafficked wildlife. “The traction on pangolin conservation in Zimbabwe is very positive,” she said.Tinashe Farawo, a spokesman for the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority, told Mongabay that the authority valued the chiefs’ role in curtailing pangolin poaching in the country.“We are working closely with traditional leaders as the custodian of our wildlife to stop poaching and it is helping a lot,” Farawo said. “Chiefs are helping in our educational awareness [campaigns] and people are responding very well.”But there’s a limit to what the chiefs can do in the face of extreme incentives to poach. Early this year, four men under Chief Mutasa in Mutasa communal land were arrested in the capital, Harare, for trying to sell two pangolins. The case is still pending before the courts.It remains to be seen whether people on Zimunya communal land can withstand the lure of big money from international pangolin poachers as worsening poverty pushes many people in the area to the edge.Baby pangolins travel on their mother’s backs. Image courtesy of the Tikki Hywood Foundation.Banner image: A ground pangolin (Smutsia temminckii), the species of pangolin that lives in Zimbabwe. Three other pangolin species live in Africa, and four others live in Asia. Image by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Headquarters via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0).FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

‘Judas’ snakes lead scientists on a high-tech Easter egg hunt for pythons

first_imgFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. DNA, Freshwater Ecosystems, Invasive Species, Mapping, Monitoring, Snakes, surveys, Tagging, Technology, Tracking, Wetlands, Wildtech Scientists are exploring various technologies to address the spread of highly invasive Burmese pythons, which have devastated native mammal and bird populations across much of southern Florida.Researchers who recently captured a large pregnant Burmese python did so using the “Judas” technique: the radio-tagging of adult pythons that will approach others of the opposite sex during the breeding season, “betraying” them to the research teams.More recently, separate research teams have trialed the use of environmental DNA (eDNA) to determine the spatial distribution, range limits, and expansion rates of Burmese pythons in the region. They found python eDNA within a wildlife refuge, indicating that the invaded area extends further north than previously thought and that pythons are likely resident there. Remember that 3-meter (17-foot) pregnant Burmese python recently captured by wildlife authorities in southern Florida? These snakes, invasive to North America and destructive to native wildlife, are cryptic in both their coloration and behavior, making them difficult to find. But scientists found this female with the help of some tracking tags and a cooperative male python.Moreover, they’ve used DNA the snakes have left behind to identify areas already invaded by the pythons, which can help researchers determine the range limits of these snakes and assess efforts to control their spread.Researchers and National Park Service staff display the full 5.1 meters (17 feet) of the pregnant Burmese python.  Wildlife officials say this snake is the largest Burmese python ever to be removed from Big Cypress National Preserve in the Florida Everglades. Image courtesy of Florida Everglades National Park Service.Burmese pythons (Python bivittatus), native to Southeast Asia, have no predators in Florida, so the few snakes brought to the United States through the pet trade that escaped or were released have quickly reproduced and morphed into an out-of-control, continuously growing population there, likely established since before the 1990s. Pythons’ long life span and large clutches of eggs have further enabled them to spread across southern Florida.Along the way, they’ve decimated the populations of numerous native species, eliminating large portions of the region’s small and medium-sized mammals and now suspected of turning to the iconic wading bird colonies of the Everglades wetland ecosystem.The ‘Judas’ technique Traditional methods of visually searching for and trapping the animals have been generally ineffective in locating pythons in the region’s inaccessible, dense, swampy vegetation.Scientists have thus turned to a tracking strategy called the “Judas” technique, which uses a radio-tagged individual of an invasive species to approach and “betray” others of the same species, or conspecifics, to the researchers following them.The story of Judas, the biblical disciple who betrayed Jesus to religious officials, thereby leading to Jesus’s crucifixion, typically gets an airing during Easter. Today, the name’s been adopted for a technique that scientists use to find social animals, such as invasive goats and pigs, often transported by people to islands, in an effort to eradicate the invasive exotic species and enable native plants and animals to recover.Goats bought by people to various Galapagos islands destroy vegetation, leaving little for giant tortoises and other native herbivores. In the absence of predators, the goats have proliferated, increasing the threat to native plants and animals. They prefer to move in groups, making the “Judas” goat a feasible strategy for locating even the most wary individuals. Researchers can follow the tagged goat to the group, where they kill all but the Judas goat, who is free to find another group. Image from BBC Youtube.Once pursued by research or management teams, these animals become extremely wary of humans, but they like being in groups and will approach a conspecific through normal social behavior.  In the case of the Burmese pythons, individual snakes in southern Florida are normally solitary and highly cryptic, but they come together between December and April to mate.In this method, researchers implant tiny radio transmitters into each “Judas” python, locate the released tagged snakes, and monitor their movements using receivers attached to a small plane. Once relocated, researchers approach a tagged snake on foot, record the GPS coordinates of its location, and search for other pythons in the area. Over time, the researchers glean the animals’ movement patterns and use of the various vegetation types, including upland and lowland forest, marsh prairie, freshwater grasslands, coastal, and open water. They also record the number of “betrayal” events and number of individual pythons betrayed per field visit by a given tagged python.The use of radio tags and a small plane or helicopter means the method is relatively expensive, but it offers researchers access to large female snakes, such as the recently caught individual who was carrying 73 eggs.“This is one more tool we can add to our tool box to help us combat this invasive species,” Brian Smith, a contractor with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) who led a study documenting the radio-tagging of Burmese pythons in southern Florida, said in a 2016 statement. “It’s effective at a time of year when we do not catch pythons on the road, and … it provides more opportunities to catch the really big, breeding females.”That initial study, conducted in Everglades National Park, found that python betrayal events were particularly likely to occur in lowland forest and tree islands within the massive wetland system, suggesting that researchers should target those habitat types when searching for breeding individuals.The Judas technique is more expensive per python caught than opportunistic detection during road monitoring, and it’s applicable only during the few months when the snakes aggregate. However, it provides researchers with access to females with high reproductive potential and is effective at times of the year when road surveys aren’t possible due to flooding. The two methods can thus complement each other.“Despite the cost [of the Judas technique], it has been the best method to help us find more, large, reproductive individuals during the breeding season,” said Kristen Hart, a USGS research ecologist, 2016 study co-author, and a graduate adviser to Smith. “Removal of these large breeders is essential if we are ever to make a dent in the python population.”eDNAA more recent technology using species’ DNA has helped python research teams further target their searches to make better use of both the Judas technique and road surveys.In a recent pair of studies, researchers assessed the range limits of pythons in a south Florida wildlife reserve and the tendency of pythons to target wading bird breeding sites.The teams tested the use of environmental DNA, or eDNA, in water samples from within the Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, where pythons hadn’t been detected previously and from areas south of the reserve, where pythons were known to occur.A Burmese python up close. In the wild, these snakes average 3.7 m (12 feet) long, but can reach 7 m (23 feet). In areas where they’ve become established, sightings of many native mammals, including raccoons, rabbits, possums, and deer, have decreased by over 90 percent. Image by Brian Smith-U.S. Geological Survey.eDNA is the genetic material from the skin, hair, scales, feces, pollen, or seeds shed by living creatures into the environment and extracted from soil or water, rather than directly from a plant or animal. Analyzing eDNA has enabled scientists to determine the presence of a particular species or describe the community of plants or animals in an area.Scientists collect eDNA through simple water or soil samples, which makes data collection faster and more cost effective than having to extract a blood or tissue sample from an animal or plant. Analysis of the eDNA requires comparing the DNA in the samples to existing sequence data for the species of interest, usually from a reference database, as well as standard genetic analysis tools. Once reference data are available, costs associated with genetic analyses decrease rapidly over time.Being able to quickly sample large areas can help researchers determine the presence of an invasive species in previously unstudied areas. According to the team assessing the Loxahatchee Refuge, “the ability to detect invasive species at low densities or prior to establishment is critical for successful control and eradication efforts.” The same basic genetic information can also help managers assess the success of their control or removal efforts; repeated tests that do not detect a species could signal a successful removal campaign.The Loxahatchee researchers aimed to determine the range limits of the area invaded by pythons. They found Burmese python eDNA within the refuge, showing that the invaded area extends further north than previously thought and that pythons are likely resident there.They found python eDNA at most sampling sites throughout their three-year collection period, which, they write in their paper, “is consistent with the pattern expected for a resident python population, as opposed to sporadic, transient individuals or alternative vectors.”Egrets and wood storks share a tree for their nests in the Everglades wetland ecosystem. Scientists have found greater presence of established python populations near wading bird colonies than around islands with no nesting birds, suggesting that resource managers focus python monitoring and control efforts in areas of nesting wading birds. Image via pxhere, CC 0.Similarly, scientists who collected and examined python eDNA around the region’s wading bird colonies, found that the amount of python eDNA was higher around colonies than around control islands (with no wading birds), “suggesting that pythons are attracted to wading bird colonies during the wading bird breeding season” and that the pythons’ wide distribution across the central Everglades was related to areas near active bird colonies.They found eDNA analysis to be “the most powerful and quantitatively accurate technique currently available,” especially in habitats where accessibility is difficult and the dense vegetation makes it hard to spot pythons.CitationsHunter, M. E., Meigs-Friend, G., Ferrante, J. A., Smith, B. J., & Hart, K. M. (2019). Efficacy of eDNA as an early detection indicator for Burmese pythons in the ARM Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge in the greater Everglades ecosystem. Ecological Indicators, 102, 617-622. doi: 10.1016/j.ecolind.2019.02.058Smith, B. J., Cherkiss, M. S., Hart, K. M., Rochford, M. R., Selby, T. H., Snow, R. W., & Mazzotti, F. J. (2016). Betrayal: Radio-tagged Burmese pythons reveal locations of conspecifics in Everglades National Park. Biological Invasions, 18(11), 3239-3250. doi: 10.1007/s10530-016-1211-5 Article published by Sue Palminteri Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more