first_imgI’ve been a fan of Simon Sinek for years, and as such, I am subscribed to get a daily e-mail with a pearl of wisdom.  I typically share these on various social media channels as I feel that great content and little tidbits that make you think are better shared than hoarded.This week, I received the following quote:  “Bad days don’t make it a bad job. Good days don’t make it a good job. Like a relationship, it’s the general feeling we get when we think about our work, and not the excitement or stress on any particular day, that defines our fulfillment.”Amen, and I’d like to expand on that.  Not only does a bad day not equal a bad job nor a good day make a good job, your happiness is not determined by your JOB.I have seen quite a few tweets and LinkedIn posts lately from people who will equate their mood to their job satisfaction or how their day at work has been.  It’s simply not that simple.  Happiness comes from within – true happiness is up to you.  Yes, we can take pride in a job well done or in helping to solve a problem.  However, that’s not happiness, that’s pride in our work.  I read a book with my neighborhood book club lately called “Happiness is a Habit,” and I encourage you to read it if you have not had the chance.  There are over 40 “habits” in the book to practice, and spoiler alert: not one of those habits was related to our jobs.  In fact, many of them were related to self-care, spending time with those that energize us rather than drain us, giving back, etc.Rachel Hollis discusses the idea of happiness in her book “Girl, Wash Your Face:  Stop Believing the Lies About Who You Are so You Can Become Who You Were Meant to Be.” One of the “Lies” in her book is “The Lie:  Something Else Will Make Me Happy.”  She discusses the tragic misstep in making your happiness dependent on something happening. In the business world, it can sound like this:”When I have my dream job, I’ll be happy.” “When I reach this level in my career, I’ll be happy.”Sound familiar?  What are you waiting on?  How long will this take, and are you okay with being “unhappy” in the meantime? Growing old is not a luxury afforded to all.  What if you find yourself standing and the pearly gates (or whatever your faith equates with the end of your time on earth), and you have a full list of work-related accomplishments, job-related satisfaction, and there was no time for yourself, your loved ones, or your friends as you were busy building this career, constantly overwhelmed, so that you could finally be “happy?”Starting today, what steps can you take toward true happiness that comes from within?  What one thing can you do today to take responsibility for your life and your happiness?Choose to be happy.last_img

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