Formula E Drivers Expect Lots Of Attack Mode Overtakings

first_img Formula E Attack Mode Showcased In New Video Source: Electric Vehicle News Formula E Might Boost Attack Mode Power Several ABB FIA Formula E drivers are expecting the championship’s attack mode to produce more overtaking at this weekend’s Marrakech E-Prix due to the placement of the activation zone. Attack Mode Is Exactly What Formula E Neededcenter_img The Mario Kart-inspired system was used for the first time at the season-opening race in Saudi Arabia, but the activation zone at the Ad Diriyah track had to be moved after criticism from the drivers.More Attacks That setting was close to a wall on the inside of tight right-hander, whereas the activation placement in Marrakech is on the outside of the long left-hand Turn 3 and goes more naturally away from the racing line.Virgin Racing’s Sam Bird reckons activating the system will mean drivers can put the higher power on offer to immediate use as a result of the zone’s place on the track.“There will be more overtaking here than there was at the last race due to it being just before a very long straight and it being in a better position,” Bird told Motorsport.com.Reigning FE champion Jean-Eric Vergne, who amongst the drivers to criticise the Riyadh attack mode setting before it was adjusted, expects activating the system to be “a bit better because it’s in a better place – a better spot”.“It was very close to the wall [in Riyadh], you almost had to touch the wall to activate it,” he explained to Motorsport.com.The attack mode setting at the first race also meant the drivers were losing a significant amount of time making sure they were getting fully into the zone to hit the timing loops that need to be driven over to activate the system.Motorsport.com understands that these loops are now visible on the track surface in Marrakech.BMW Andretti driver Alexander Sims told Motorsport.com that as a result “it’s not going to be quite as hard and I would guess not quite as much of a time penalty to use it”.“You can see it and it’s not tighter than the corner, it’s making the corner a bit more wide,” he continued.“The big thing to me is how many marbles and how much dust and stuff is going to be put there and whether you’re first to use it or doing it after 20 cars have gone through.“There’s probably more potential for it to enable you to overtake rather than just get a time deficit to make up.” Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 11, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

Travel Retail Norway Places Order For Tesla Semi

first_imgSource: Electric Vehicle News Many companies have the utmost faith in Tesla, as reservations continue to come in for its electric semi.Naysayers, shorters, and haters aside, it’s obvious that many people have plenty of faith in Tesla. Far prior to its all-electric semi going into production or coming to fruition, many orders continue to come in.Yep, Norway Has Its Ducks In A Row: It comes as no surprise that a company in Norway would get onboard with a Tesla Semi pre-order. As we’ve continued to share, Norway is a major hub for EVs in general.Tesla has plans to begin production of its semi by the end of this year. However, those that follow the segment know that it may be another year or two before this actually happens. Moreover, it may be another year on top of that before the Silicon Valley automaker can come to terms with securing all the mounting deliveries.Will the Tesla Semi even come to be? We have asked that question repeatedly. But, even if it was originally a figment of CEO Elon Musk’s imagination, with all this increasing interest and all these continuing orders, Tesla would be silly to call it quits on the project. Not to mention the company has incredible, working concepts at large.Let’s add Travel Retail Norway to the growing list of interested candidates. It’s a company that handles duty-free stores at Norway’s five most substantial airports. The company’s lead communication manager —  Haakon Dagestad — said in a press release this week (via Electrek):In many areas, we will help to make tax-free sustainable. That’s why we work with different solutions to transport goods from all over the world to Norway in the most environmentally friendly way. Tesla Semi is one of the measures.Our warehouse is already electrified with a solar panel, so now the road from the warehouse to the shops will be electrified too. If we charged the trucks with renewable energy, it will have a very positive effect, both on climate and local pollution.If all plays out as planned, Travel Retail Norway will be the first company to move items from other European countries to Norway via all-electric transport. Sadly, the company says it has no clue when it will get its Tesla Semi. Nonetheless, the order stands and it’s on its way to emissions-free transport.Source: Electrek Norway Is The Place To Be For Tesla Owners and EV Lovers Avis Ordered 280 Teslas For Fleet Use In Norway Electric Cars Accounted For 1/3 Of Norway’s New Car Sales In 2018 Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 14, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

New study claiming electric cars are dirtier than diesel debunked

first_imgSource: Charge Forward Electric vehicle detractors are rejoicing after a new study from the Munich-based IFO Institute for Economic Research is claiming electric cars are dirtier than diesel, but the study is already being debunked for being extremely flawed. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2LVEtRE51hUThe post New study claiming electric cars are dirtier than diesel debunked appeared first on Electrek.last_img

More Than Five Years After Being Charged And Without Admitting Or Denying

first_imgAs highlighted in posts here and here, in September 2016 the court denied the motions for summary judgment and in doing so rejected the SEC’s position that it may pursue FCPA violations that occurred out of the limitations period on the basis that those violations were similar in character to and part of the same alleged “scheme” as violations that occurred within the limitations.Trial was scheduled to begin in May 2017.Last week, without admitting or denying the SEC’s allegations, Morvai agreed to resolve the action by agreeing to pay a $60,000 civil penalty and other remedial relief.Score this one as you like.But when a civil action settles over 5 years after it was filed, after the SEC dropped certain of its claims, after the SEC’s summary judgment motion was denied, and when the individual defendant settles without admitting or denying the SEC’s allegations and agrees to pay (a relatively) modest civil penalty, I’ve got my answer.The SEC’s claims as to Straub and Balogh remain pending and the following fact bears repeating.In FCPA history, the SEC is believed to have never prevailed in an FCPA enforcement action when put to its ultimate burden of proof. Free 90 Minute 2017 FCPA Year In Review Video A summary of every corporate enforcement action; notable statistics and issues to consider; compliance take-away points; and enforcement agency and related developments. Click below to view the engaging video tutorial. In December 2011, in connection with the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement action against Magyar Telekom, the SEC also charged former Magyar Telekom executives Elek Straub (former Chairman and CEO); Andras Balogh (former Director of Central Strategic Organization); and Tamas Morvai (former Director of Business Development and Acquisitions) with various FCPA and related offenses. (See here for the prior post).The complaint alleged, in connection with a bribery scheme in Macedonia and Montenegro, that the individuals violated or aided and abetted violations of the FCPA’s anti-bribery, books and records, and internal controls provisions; knowingly circumvented internal controls and falsified books and records; and made false statements to the company’s auditor.Unlike most FCPA individual defendants (criminal or civil), the individuals mounted a defense (see here) and the SEC was put in the rare position of having to prove an FCPA case. A motion to dismiss was filed (largely on jurisdictional and statue of limitations issues) and in February 2013 the court denied the motion to dismiss. (See here for the prior post).Put in a position to prove its case, the SEC ultimately dropped its claims that the individuals bribed Montenegro officials. (See here).The case proceeded through discovery and competing motions for summary judgment were filed. In late August 2016 oral argument on the motions were heard as to the following issues:statute of limitations issues;the jurisdictional element of the FCPA’s anti-bribery provisions including whether a key document in the SEC’s complaint was indeed in furtherance of a bribery scheme or merely a legitimate business document;general personal jurisdiction issues; andtwo of the SEC’s claims that do not necessarily involve bribery, but rather falsification of books and records and false statements to auditors.center_img Viewlast_img read more

SCOTX Examines When Broad Discovery Becomes Too Broad

first_img Password Username Lost your password? Remember mecenter_img How much discovery is too much? The Texas Supreme Court recently offered important guidance on this practical question, holding that a request for “similar” insurance claim files was overly broad, even with limits as to place and time. This article has the full details and analysis . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.last_img

A Week Changing Aging

first_imgby, Dr. Bill ThomasTweet7Share12ShareEmail19 Shares The Eden Alternative’s Chris Perna and Carol Ende in NashvilleImagine my surprise when I discovered that the December issue of The Magazine from AARP named me as one of the most influential people in America over age 50 “Changing Our Views on Aging.” In particular, they focused on my role as the founder of The Eden Alternative. Pretty cool.Since Jude is now feeling better, I was able to slip out of town and head down to beautiful Nashville, Tennessee. There I helped the Eden Alternative team launch a terrific new dementia training program that is being supported by a $370,000 grant from CMS. This is the largest grant in Eden’s history and it is going to make a real impact on Elders and Care-Partners in Tennessee.From there I flew to Washington, D.C. I got up early the next morning and walked over to the National Press Club. The National Press Club, Washington, D.C.I was honored to be able to speak about the Generations United report on Hunger in America. This is an intergenerational problem that will require us all to develop intergenerational solutions.From there I walked down the street and visited with my friends at AARP. I am happy to announce that I will be helping AARP bring its “Life Re-Imagined” to the world. I love the concept of “Life Re-Imagined” because it reverses the common misunderstanding of aging as decline and gives us the prospect of exciting personal growth. Look for much more from me about this in 2013. Get a sneak peek here at Life Re-Imagined HERE.From there I took the Acela to NYC.I spent Thursday morning taping interviews for the new “Alive Inside” documentary that will be running on PBS in 2013. The film reveals the powerful impact that music can have in the lives of older people. We taped on the 21st floor of a building across from Bryant Park. At one point we had to stop recording because of what we thought at first was the sound of a bird singing. We all laughed when we realized that it was actually the whistle of a cop directing traffic 21 stories below us. Music baby!See a clip from the upcoming film HERE.After a quick lunch with the Alive Inside guys, I walked down the street to meet with Trish Todd. Trish is my editor at Simon and Schuster and I LOVE LOVE LOVE her. She is smart, she is passionate and she is real. We talked for about an hour about my new book (Title yet TBD) and after I left she kindly tweeted her reaction to the manuscript:@drbillthomas Gorgeously written, full of new ideas, and lots of good stuff happening around it.What editor could ask for more?!— Trish Todd (@TrishTodd718) December 7, 2012I took the bus home to Ithaca and savored a new book I am reading— “1493”. It describes “globalization’s” impact on people and the environment in the wake of the “discovery” of the Americas.More about the book HEREOverall, it was a pretty good week.Related PostsAARP Features Bill Thomas As Founder of The Eden AlternativeMake sure you get a copy of the December issue of The Magazine from AARP to see Dr. Bill Thomas recognized as one of the most influential people in America “Changing Our Views on Aging”.ChangingAging Blogstream Weekly Blog Roundup July 7-17Weekly Blog Roundup This is What Spouses Do By Dr. Bill Thomas Aging Services Summit Will Address Potential Impact of Federal Budget Cuts on Aging Populations By Kavan Peterson The negotiations in Washington over raising the federal debt limit are down to the wire with potentially drastic budget cuts to…The DudeI’ve often said that “aging is a team” sport. It is also true that “changing aging” is a team sport. For the past six years I have enjoyed working with and learning from Kavan Peterson as he has shown me how our message of a new and better old age…Tweet7Share12ShareEmail19 SharesTags: Care Partnerlast_img read more

Nightly Roundup July 8 2019

first_imgpic.twitter.com/SbvYp5F5Ah— Mike Drennen II (@UhhMyNameDonut) July 4, 2019 Matt Fortuna from The Athletic wrote up a “State of the Program” piece for Minnesota (LINK). Dublin (OH) Coffman 2020 running back Mike Drennen II (4-star, #5 all-purpose back, #206 overall) surprising shut Michigan out of his top ten: Hit the jump for more. Tags: nightly roundup Jonathan Taylor (image via Bucky’s 5th Quarter) Katy (TX) Tompkins 2021 defensive tackle Tunmise Adeleye (4-star, #4 SDE, #48 overall) named Michigan to his top ten: Top ten… #TheMarathonContinues Edit via: @JTSchoenemann pic.twitter.com/zKAiuwNXOI— Tunmise (@tunmiseadeleye) July 5, 2019  1 0You need to login in order to vote Here’s a fluff piece on Wisconsin running back Jonathan Taylor (LINK).last_img read more

USC researchers develop new portable device for earlystage malaria detection

first_img Source:https://www.usc.edu/ May 23 2018According to the World Health Organization, over 216 million people were infected with malaria in 2016, and 445,000 individuals died from the disease. The key to solving this health crisis is early-stage diagnosis when malaria therapeutics are most effective. A new prototype for a portable instrument capable early-stage malaria detection has been developed by a team of researchers at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering.There are two standard ways of diagnosing malaria–yet both have limitations. The first involves taking a blood sample from a person and looking at it underneath a microscope for red blood cells that have been infected with the malaria parasite. This involves counting cells–which is manually intensive and dependent on the technician reading the blood smears. The second approach, known as the rapid diagnostic test (RDT), works in about 15 minutes. However, without refrigeration, RDTs can spoil like milk or eggs.”Malaria primarily impacts low-resource environments where supply chain management is difficult and access to power can be unreliable. Therefore, an effective malaria diagnostic must be independent of these,” said corresponding author Andrea Armani, the Ray Irani Chair in Engineering and Materials Science whose lab is located in the new USC Michelson Center for Convergent Bioscience.Advantages of PODSThe portable optical diagnostics system (PODS) prototype developed by USC Viterbi engineers Andrea Armani, Samantha McBirney, Dongyu Chen, and Alexis Scholtz, detects a byproduct generated by all species of the malaria parasite. As such, it is a rapid screening for all malaria strains.The PODS instrument was designed to solve the challenges limiting current systems. To minimize size, weight, and power requirements without sacrificing performance, every aspect was considered. The current prototype weighs fewer than 10 pounds, is 12 by 10 inches (the size of a large shoebox) and can be powered by a battery for eight hours. In addition, PODS was designed to require minimal sample processing and handling, as well as eliminate the need for secondary chemicals with strict storage requirements. This makes the device particularly suited to low-resource environments.The end result: The current prototype developed by USC researchers can analyze an unprocessed, whole blood sample in 10-15 minutes. With only 500 μL of blood (five to seven drops), it can achieve sensitivity levels needed for an early-stage diagnosis.”With PODS, we can do rapid, broad population screening for malaria in low-resource environments. When combined with currently available therapeutics, this could represent a tipping point in the global fight against malaria,” says Armani.How the Device WorksMalaria-infected mosquitoes infect human hosts with the parasite. Its primary nutrient source is hemoglobin, a component of red blood cells. As the parasite digests hemoglobin, it creates what is known as heme as a byproduct.”While heme is highly toxic to both the parasite and its host, the parasite has figured out a ‘loophole’ around this by aggregating heme into an insoluble nanocrystal known as hemozoin. Unlike all other naturally-occurring materials in the blood, hemozoin is magnetic,” says lead author, co-inventor, and recent biomedical engineering Ph.D. graduate, Samantha McBirney.Because the amount of hemozoin in the blood is directly related to how far the malaria infection has progressed, it is an ideal indicator of infection. However, detecting a few hemozoin nanoparticles in blood is extremely challenging because blood has many components that can interfere with the measurement. To overcome this problem, the researchers took inspiration from recent discoveries in personalized medicine and leveraged the magnetic behavior of the nanoparticles in their diagnostic design.Related StoriesMosquito surveillance in Madagascar reveals new insight into malaria transmissionScientists identify malaria’s Achilles’ heelHuman liver cell protein aids development of malaria parasite, study findsPODS has three primary components: a laser, a detector (to detect light), and a magnet. When a sample of blood is placed between the laser and the detector, the amount of light that makes it to the detector decreases as the blood blocks it. If hemozoin is present, even less light shines through. At high concentrations even in blood, it is readily apparent if hemozoin is present because the nanocrystal is very good at blocking light. However, as the concentrations decrease to values indicative of early stage malaria, it becomes harder to detect the presence of hemozoin. (Additionally, everyone’s blood absorbs light a little differently, further complicating the measurement.)Recent advances in personalized medicine for cancer have demonstrated the importance of not relying on statistical averages to establish “normal” or “healthy,” benchmarks but instead using a patient’s own sample. Normally, this approach is extremely difficult to implement, as it requires obtaining samples from the patient pre-illness. However, in the diagnostic developed by USC researchers, this strategy can be applied by taking two measurements: one with the nanoparticles and one without the nanoparticles.By applying a magnet, it is possible to manipulate and move the hemozoin particles within a test tube around, or move them in and out of the laser beam. In this way, a single sample can be used to perform two measurements, and every diagnosis is personalized. If hemozoin is present, even in minute concentrations, the signals change. On average, it takes between 10 to 15 minutes for the signal to stabilize, and a larger difference between the two measurements indicates that the malaria has progressed farther.”PODS operates on a very simple design concept. If there is hemozoin, then there must be malaria,” said Armani, “The challenging part was distinguishing the tiny hemozoin nanoparticles from everything else in the whole blood sample.”Design PhilosophyThe researchers employed a military design strategy, intentionally designing the device to try to use inexpensive, off-the-shelf components and not require any reagents. If a component fails, the engineers wanted to ensure that it was not necessary to seek out a custom supplier or a single source supplier.”All the parts are readily accessible and easily replaced,” says McBirney.McBirney was driven to work on this particular problem., “Malaria may not be a concern for those of us living in developed countries, it’s still the leading cause of death in the world, and of the hundreds of thousands of deaths every year, nearly 70% of those are children under 5 years old. These aren’t deaths occurring in the last five years of life, when someone has already lived out his/her hopes and dreams, when someone already has a family and has lived his/her life to the fullest – these are deaths occurring before a child even knows his/her place in this world, before he/she even knows why he/she is here. This is heartbreaking. If we can play even the smallest role in eradication, that would be tremendous.”Next StepsThe researchers are now working on the next generation of the device to improve its ruggedness and further reduce the sample volume to under 200 μL, (one to two drops) of blood. They expect to eliminate the attached laptop so the device could operate for over 30 hours with an external battery pack or be hand-powered.last_img read more

Quick adoption of new diagnostic tests could help NHS to save nearly

first_imgJun 20 2018Research commissioned by Innovate UK and the British In Vitro Diagnostics Association (BIVDA) reveals that the NHS could save over £6.9 billion in five years through quick adoption of new diagnostic tests as they come onto the market. In turn, these savings could help tackle the annual NHS shortfall, widely expected to reach £20 billion by 2022.Patients would benefit from three new tests – for heart attack, pre-eclampsia and inflammatory bowel disease – by reducing unnecessary procedures and medication while delivering significant NHS savings.At the moment, the tests are used in only a handful of clinics and hospitals, although many health experts predict they would save huge sums if used more widely.Doris-Ann Williams, BIVDA’s Chief Executive, said: Source:https://www.bivda.org.uk/News-Events/BIVDA-Press-Releases/ArticleID/152/NHS-could-save-nearly-%C2%A37-billion-through-quick-adoption-of-new-diagnostic-techniques Related StoriesScientists develop universal FACS-based approach to heterogenous cell sorting, propelling organoid researchAXT enhances cellular research product portfolio with solutions from StemBioSysResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairThe report calls on healthcare leaders and policy makers to reassess how these three high-impact examples, along with many other diagnostic technologies available now, could be better deployed within the NHS.Innovate UK is currently delivering the “From Data to Early Diagnostics and Precision Medicine” Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund (ISCF), investing in new technologies which diagnose disease earlier and reduce patient suffering.Dr Kath Mackay, Innovate UK Interim Director for Ageing Society, Health & Nutrition, said: There are so many innovative diagnostic tests on the market and in development. It’s important for all stakeholders that we take every opportunity to rapidly adopt tests which show cost savings and benefit to patients.” Whilst the shakeup of NHS services and funding so often takes the headlines, simply making the most of the tests we already have would result in dramatic savings.”last_img read more

Genetic sequencing reveals new clues to aggressiveness of prostate cancer

first_imgJul 20 2018Using genetic sequencing, scientists have revealed the complete DNA makeup of more than 100 aggressive prostate tumors, pinpointing important genetic errors these deadly tumors have in common. The study lays the foundation for finding new ways to treat prostate cancer, particularly for the most aggressive forms of the disease.The multicenter study, which examined the genomes of tumors that grew and spread quickly, was led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of California, San Francisco. The research appears July 19 in the journal Cell.”This study could aid the search for better therapies to treat aggressive prostate cancer,” said co-first author Christopher A. Maher, PhD, an associate professor of medicine and an assistant director at The McDonnell Genome Institute at Washington University School of Medicine. “More immediately, the new information could help doctors find ways to identify which patients may develop aggressive tumors, and help guide their treatment decisions.”More than 160,000 cases of prostate cancer are diagnosed each year in the U.S. While some 80 percent of prostate cancer patients have tumors that are slow-growing and have effective treatment options, about 20 percent of such patients develop the most aggressive forms of the disease -; the focus of the new study.Most genetic studies of prostate cancer have focused on parts of the genome that control what proteins a tumor manufactures. Proteins act like the machinery of cells. When they function properly, proteins perform cellular tasks required for good health. But when proteins don’t work properly, disease, including cancer, can result.Still, genes that make proteins represent only 1 to 2 percent of the entire genome. The new analysis is the first large-scale study of the whole genomes -; all of the DNA, including all of each tumor’s genes -; of metastatic prostate tumors, and reveals that many of these tumors have problems in the sections of the genome that tell protein-coding genes what to do.”Protein-coding genes are important, but when you focus only on them you can miss mutations in regions of the genome that regulate those genes,” Maher said.Related StoriesTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsStudy: Nearly a quarter of low-risk thyroid cancer patients receive more treatment than necessaryThe researchers were surprised to find that about 80 percent of the aggressive tumors studied had the same genetic alterations in a region of the genome that controls the androgen receptor, Maher said. This genetic error dialed up levels of androgen receptor on prostate cancer cells. Such receptors bind to male hormones such as testosterone and drive tumor growth.”This was one of the most surprising findings,” said Maher, also a research member of Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine. “We saw too many repeated copies of DNA in this region of the genome. In some of these patients, the androgen receptor looks totally normal. But they have too much androgen receptor because the receptor’s regulatory region is dialed up, which would be missed by the protein-coding focused sequencing studies.”A common treatment for prostate cancer, beyond the traditional options of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation, involves androgen deprivation therapy, in which drugs are used to block testosterone from binding to the androgen receptor. Since prostate tumors are often hormone-driven cancers, blocking testosterone from binding this receptor slows tumor growth.All the men in this study had tumors that developed resistance to androgen deprivation therapy, meaning the androgen receptor is always switched on, fueling the tumor, whether testosterone is present or not. Patients in this situation have no effective treatment options. The researchers showed that more than 80 percent of these patients had mutations that help explain the aggressiveness of their cancers; these genetic errors activated the androgen receptor.The researchers, including co-first author Ha X. Dang, PhD, a senior scientist at Washington University, also found important roles for other genes known to be involved in cancer, including those that help with DNA repair, such as TP53 and BRCA2.Source: https://medicine.wustl.edu/news/genomic-sequencing-of-prostate-tumors-reveals-clues-to-aggressiveness/last_img read more

Nomination of climate skeptic to head White House environmental office draws strong

first_img Of particular concern to environmentalists is Hartnett White’s assertion that climate change is not a danger to society and that recent hurricanes, raging wildfires and droughts are not a sign of increasingly severe weather, as well as her advocacy around the use of fossil fuels as a “moral case.”But former Trump transition officials and lobbyists defend Hartnett White as a veteran regulator and fault her critics for ignoring her record.”Some have focused on particular statements attributed to Dr. White regarding climate science,” said Scott Segal, a partner at Texas-based Bracewell LLP. “The truth is that she has written on a broader spectrum of environmental issues and has typically supported policies that advance energy, environmental and economic priorities.”Both sides agree Hartnett White will likely secure Senate approval and bring big changes to CEQ and national environmental policy.Cynthia Taub with the law firm Steptoe & Johnson said the nomination is a “game changer” for CEQ. While past administrations used the office to issue guidance and ensure agencies were implementing the National Environmental Policy Act, she said, the Trump administration is focused on streamlining reviews.”It seems Trump has a very different role in mind, and CEQ is being lined up as a streamlining agency to make sure permitting is happening more quickly,” she said. “Maybe the idea is that CEQ will be pushing agencies to get things done quicker and not get bogged down in broader NEPA reviews.”Goldfuss and three other former CEQ leaders under Obama sent a letter to the Trump administration arguing the office appears to be “inappropriately” focused on fast-tracking environmental reviews and infrastructure while sidetracking environmental protection.Of particular concern, she said, is Hartnett White’s possible oversight of environmental laws as a Republican Congress presses an infrastructure package.All of this is happening, Goldfuss said, as CEQ staffing is depleted and agencies are moving to limit the time and length of environmental reviews. According to the White House, CEQ currently has 29 employees, and Goldfuss said the agency had upward of 60 staffers under Obama.”Republicans will use the fuzzy math around deregulation to say it will pay for building bridges and roads and by deregulation,” Goldfuss said. “This will be the changes they want to make to the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Endangered Species Act, NEPA. The assault here is real.”CEQ last month published a notice declaring an intent to speed up environmental reviews for infrastructure projects (E&E News PM, Sept. 14).But Segal applauded CEQ’s recent focus on infrastructure and said Hartnett White “joins a team already undertaking a serious-minded and capable review of the federal government’s role in energy and environmental projects.””Reforming NEPA is essential to getting the economy back to 3 percent annual growth,” said Myron Ebell at the Competitive Enterprise Institute. “Kathleen brings the skills, experience and determination necessary to accomplish significant NEPA reform. She will also be useful to the administration on reforming the ESA and wetlands permitting.”Tom Pyle, president of the Institute for Energy Research, said Harnett White’s views are consistent with the Trump administration’s of “resetting” environmental priorities and focusing on infrastructure.”We look forward to working with her to improve the environment and the economy while repairing the broken relationship between the federal government, the states and stakeholders at the same time,” Pyle said. By Hannah Northey, E&E NewsOct. 13, 2017 , 5:49 PM Read more… Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC BY SA) Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email “She will more aggressively go after dismantling all environmental laws — that’s the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, that’s the National Environmental Policy Act and the Endangered Species Act,” said Christy Goldfuss, who led CEQ in the Obama administration. “It’s creative evil, is what someone told me today.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Originally published by E&E NewsPresident Trump’s nomination of a former Texas regulator who’s touted the benefits of carbon dioxide to lead the Council on Environmental Quality is being praised by industry but derided by environmentalists as “creative evil” and a “nightmare scenario.”If confirmed by the Senate, Kathleen Hartnett White would lead a short-handed White House office that’s traditionally been seen as an environmental watchdog on Pennsylvania Avenue. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Reprinted from Greenwire with permission from E&E News. Copyright 2017. E&E provides essential news for energy and environment professionals at www.eenews.net President Trump nominated Kathleen Hartnett White to lead the Council on Environmental Quality. Nomination of climate skeptic to head White House environmental office draws strong reactionslast_img read more

NIH letters asking about undisclosed foreign ties rattle US universities

first_img Another fear is that the inquiry may become a vehicle to impugn the loyalty of any faculty member—and especially any foreign-born scientists—who maintains overseas ties. For example, ScienceInsider has learned that at some institutions, every researcher flagged by NIH is Chinese-American.The vaguely worded letters don’t contain specific accusations. Rather, they ask the university to explain a faculty member’s apparent failure to disclose a foreign connection to NIH.It is not clear how the agency developed its list of targeted researchers. One possibility is a data-mining exercise designed to flag cases in which a scientist cites a relationship to a foreign entity in a journal article or other public document that wasn’t disclosed in their NIH grant application or annual progress report to the agency. University officials have told ScienceInsider that some allegations have turned out to be unfounded, either because no such relationship exists or because NIH was unaware that it had been disclosed.Last summer, NIH Director Francis Collins hinted that such personalized letters might be on their way. In a 20 August 2018 missive to more than 10,000 institutions, he asserted that “threats to the integrity of U.S. biomedical research exist” and highlighted the failure to disclose “substantial resources from other organizations, including foreign governments.” Collins wrote that “in the weeks and months ahead you may be hearing from [NIH] regarding … requests about specific … personnel from your institution.”NIH officials have declined to discuss any aspect of the process. But one university administrator told ScienceInsider that a wave of letters sent in January targeted 77 institutions. NIH typically asked the schools to reply within 1 month but didn’t specify how universities were to obtain the requested information or how the agency might use the answers.One possibility, however, is that NIH could refer the matter to its parent agency, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). A failure to disclose foreign ties on an NIH grant application violates long-standing departmental rules and could lead to sanctions. (Such disclosure is part of a broader NIH requirement that scientists must declare “all financial resources … in direct support of [their] research endeavors.”) Last month. Senator Charles Grassley (R–IA) revealed that NIH has asked HHS to investigate 12 such cases, but the lawmaker did not say how NIH learned of the allegations.NIH’s description of what kinds of foreign ties and activities are covered by the disclosure policy leaves a lot of ambiguity, according to several university officials. For example, must a researcher disclose an honorary degree from a foreign university, or only a joint appointment to that university? Do fees a researcher gets from consulting represent a source of “direct support” for their research? Should researchers disclose a collaboration with a foreign scientist in which no funds are co-mingled, but that results in a co-authored publication in which the U.S. scientist cites the foreign colleague’s source of funding as a matter of professional courtesy?University officials say it’s never been clear whether disclosure rules also apply to research done on a faculty member’s own time, for example, during the summer if they receive only a 9-month salary from their university. Many universities don’t pay too much attention to what faculty members are doing while they are off the payroll, so long as it doesn’t interfere or conflict with their teaching and administrative duties.In discussions with university administrators, NIH officials have cited three ways that undeclared foreign ties can damage the research enterprise. The first is by stealing a researcher’s time from other projects, leading to what NIH calls a conflict of commitment. The second is having the work be largely redundant with an existing NIH grant and, thus, a waste of government funds. The third relates to the size of the investment; a large foreign contribution, NIH officials have said, creates “a substantial distortion” of NIH’s portfolio.In the past, university officials say, any confusion over the disclosure rules would be worked out amicably in discussions with NIH. But one academic research administrator who requested anonymity worries that the wave of letters suggest a once collegial relationship may have turned adversarial.“I’m supposed to be fostering our institution’s relationship with government funding agencies,” the official says. “But these letters strike a very different tone. And to be honest, I don’t have the bandwidth to be an auditor as well as a facilitator.”More worrisome, the official says, is the message it could be sending to U.S. researchers: If you want to avoid trouble, don’t stray beyond the border in pursuit of the next breakthrough in science. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has recently sent letters to dozens of major U.S. research universities asking them to provide information about specific faculty members with NIH funding who are believed to have links to foreign governments that the Bethesda, Maryland–based institute did not know about.Universities are scrambling to respond to the unprecedented queries, which appear to be NIH’s response to demands from members of Congress and national security officials that federal agencies do a better job of monitoring any foreign interactions fostered by U.S. government funding. The goal is to prevent the theft of intellectual property and the transfer of technologies that could threaten U.S. security. But some academic administrators worry the exercise could cast a chill over all types of international scientific collaborations.“People have already told me that they are rethinking whether they should continue to work with someone from another country,” says one administrator who requested anonymity. “They say, ‘Maybe I should just do the work myself, or find a U.S.-based collaborator.’” The official was one of several who confirmed to ScienceInsider that their university had received such a letter; all requested anonymity. By Jeffrey MervisMar. 1, 2019 , 1:55 PM NIH letters asking about undisclosed foreign ties rattle U.S. universities National Cancer Institute Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Emaillast_img read more

Data sharing will be a major thrust of Trumps 500 million childhood

first_img Jonathan Ernst/REUTERS By Jocelyn KaiserFeb. 27, 2019 , 1:15 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Data sharing will be a major thrust of Trump’s $500 million childhood cancer plan Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Brain cancer survivor Grace Eline (right) and first lady Melania Trump (left) at the State of the Union address. Email President Donald Trump’s proposal in his State of the Union address earlier this month to spend $500 million over 10 years on pediatric cancer research will begin in 2020 with a focus on sharing patients’ data, federal officials say. That plan is getting a mixed response from researchers and patient advocates, who also worry that the initiative will come at expense of other parts of the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI’s) budget.During his speech, Trump described a “very brave” guest sitting with first lady Melania Trump—10-year-old brain cancer survivor Grace Eline, who raised funds for pediatric cancer research before developing the disease herself. “Many childhood cancers have not seen new therapies in decades. My budget will ask the Congress for $500 million over the next 10 years to fund this critical life-saving research,” Trump said. A $50-million-a-year boost would mean an 11% increase over the $462 million that NCI and other National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes expect to spend this year on pediatric cancer. (In contrast, Trump administration officials have warned that they expect to issue a budget request to Congress next month that calls for an overall 5% cut to nondefense spending in the 2020 fiscal year that begins 1 October.)The Trump announcement came as a surprise to staff at NCI and cancer patient groups. NCI officials say details are still being worked out. But during a conference call with researchers and advocates on 14 February, NCI Director Ned Sharpless in Bethesda, Maryland, who has made “big data” part of his agenda, said data sharing will be a major initial thrust of the initiative. An NCI spokesperson explains to ScienceInsider that $50 million in 2020 “would afford a unique opportunity to leverage the power of existing data and develop new knowledge that will drive discovery and development of new approaches to treat childhood cancers.” That’s welcome news to University of California, Santa Cruz, genomics researcher Olena Morozova Vaske, who with David Haussler runs a pediatric cancer genome project. She and Haussler say that because pediatric cancers are very rare, it’s crucial to combine patient data from academic and industry clinical trials as well as international patients. That will take implementing new standards and building new digital infrastructure. Existing databases “need to all be talking to each other so we can consolidate data,” Vaske says. “You really have to make sure you’re capturing information from every single patient.”But some pediatric oncologists aren’t so sure that’s the best way to spend the first $50 million. “Data sharing is of the utmost importance and the community is already doing it arguably as well as possible,” says Crystal Mackall of Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. And efforts to pool genetic data on childhood tumors may be less productive than for adult cancers because pediatric cancers have relatively few mutations, which makes them less vulnerable to gene-targeted or immunotherapy drugs, says Peter Adamson of the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia in Pennsylvania, chair of the NCI-funded Children’s Oncology Group. He suggests “the answers [to treatments] are not going to be revealed necessarily through whole genome sequencing” of children’s tumors.He and Mackall point to other needs, such as figuring out how to target so-called fusion proteins produced when two genes combine, which often drive the growth of pediatric tumors. Fusion proteins are already a focus of the cancer moonshot launched by former Vice President Joe Biden, but the investment could be larger, Adamson says. “It’s a harder problem [than data sharing] but will probably yield a higher return,” he says.Advocacy groups also point to the Childhood Cancer Survivorship, Treatment, Access, and Research (STAR) Act of 2018, a law Trump signed last summer that authorizes Congress to put $30 million annually for 5 years into pediatric cancer including biobanking and studies of survivors. “A lot of us want to build on and leverage what already exists,” which means the funding called for by Trump should come in addition to fully funding the STAR Act, says Danielle Leach, senior director of advocacy and government relations for St. Baldrick’s Foundation in Arlington, Virginia, and co-chair of the Alliance for Childhood Cancer.Another worry is whether the expected 5% cut for many research agencies in Trump’s 2020 budget request means the increase in pediatric cancer funding will come at the expense of other programs. “Until we see what [Trump] is proposing in funding for NIH and NCI in FY [fiscal year] 2020, we remain guarded and concerned,” says Jon Retzlaff, chief policy officer for the American Association for Cancer Research in Washington, D.C.As for the details of the initiative, NCI doesn’t expect to form a blue-ribbon planning committee, as it did for the moonshot. But, “We look forward to working with the cancer community and we will continue engaging them in the coming months,” the spokesperson says.last_img read more

Twitter Searches For Blue Bell Ice Cream Licker

first_img 16. Blue Bell Ice Cream lickers… a hero shall rise pic.twitter.com/fPigeds8KK— SixTwentySix © (@sixtwentysix) July 2, 2019 Blue Bell still looking for her. pic.twitter.com/9l5In8PpBP— MaryK Vibrania Bennett (@MaryKHayes) July 1, 2019 That Blue Bell ice cream girl has started something. pic.twitter.com/6tWRSW3MTQ— Tunde, MPAS, PA-C (@GatorPA_) July 2, 2019That person in the new video, identified on Instagram as shelly_golden, would later admit to what she called playing a “prank” on her 1 million-strong following on her account, which she has since made private. But the attention her videos have received could inspire other pranksters in search of the aforementioned clout on social media.Twitter users have insisted they know who the young woman is on the first video that prompted the backlash. A person who operates the Instagram account that goes by the handle xx.asiaaa.xx was allegedly the woman who did the dirty deed after being urged on by the person filming her tampering with food. 17. So wayment blue bell never had a plastic seal on top on the inside of their tub of ice cream #bluebellicecream #bluebellgirl pic.twitter.com/rmsDQsyQQp— J.Solo (@JJustITA) July 2, 2019 7. That girl and everyone like her deserve those felonies. And yes Blue Bell ice cream tub should have safety seals. Both things can be true. pic.twitter.com/rqntcRfLiK— Summer Boots (@ThiccBoots) July 3, 2019 12. Me in the middle of enjoying my Blue Bell Ice cream wondering if it’s already been “pre-licked” pic.twitter.com/FvpwRUPlHL— Kaleelee (@callmekaleelee) July 3, 2019 21. So Blue Bell can track down a woman, conclude that it was her from a cell phone video, charge her and all that but it’s just too much to ask to charge rapists, kick racists out of school for spouting slurs on camera and charging police officers with state sanctioned murder? pic.twitter.com/lCS2uJQLpO— .. (@QGotNoRings) July 2, 2019 22. She licked on Blue Bell ice cream in Texas. She’s really about to get it… pic.twitter.com/JTMx5ZriND— Larosa (@meeky_neo) July 2, 2019 1. if i find LICK MARKS in my ice cream… pic.twitter.com/kop3CjhQdz— Tiffany Vu (@suitandkai) July 3, 2019 Um. As a Brenham-ite, I’m upset at the disrespect for Blue Bell. As a human… wtf is wrong with her? pic.twitter.com/JFI0FR5VmJ— Jessica Fletcher (@heckyessica) June 29, 2019Since there is apparently a tweet for everything, Twitter users reminded everybody that there is nothing new under the sun and that the young woman on the viral video was far from alone when it came to food tampering in supermarkets. 18. people really out here licking Blue Bell ice cream in Walmart and putting it back pic.twitter.com/Vu81SmBSzq— Bradley Hovey (@bphovey) July 2, 2019 5. Wait a sec, Blue Bell actually trying to get that girl who lick the gallon ice cream? pic.twitter.com/EGYjaOypwx— Kris Davis (@Kris__Davis) July 1, 2019 She literally said this. She deserves a felony. Period. pic.twitter.com/wqHFKolhVU— A.J. (@Aireyella) July 2, 2019As of late Wednesday morning, all authorities apparently had to go on was the nine-second video clip that’s been shared millions of times on social media since the weekend, when it first surfaced. The video starts off with the unidentified Black woman smiling with her tongue hanging out of her mouth over an open container of Blue Bell ice cream before the person filming urges her to take a lick. The woman happily complies before quickly covering the ice cream back up and returning it to a grocery store freezer, all while smiling before chucking up deuces to the camera. Then the video ends, just like that.Watch the troubling footage below. 3. To the people that think it’s cute to lick ice cream pic.twitter.com/gT6FnY64Pk— alexis h (@lexiejhawk) July 3, 2019 19. Imagine going to Jail… folks ask you what you in for… and your response is….. “I had my friend record me licking Blue Bell ice cream in the supermarket and then I put it back” pic.twitter.com/XfJm1UTF7T— Naybahood Nip (@YVEvil_Genius1) July 2, 2019 9. That is disgusting and extremely immature behavior. Blue Bell needs more secure packaging and should pull the Tin Roof flavor off the shelf since it was contaminated. I will be sticking with Haagen-Dazs ice cream. pic.twitter.com/upPALJHnBi— Monek McDonald (@momo_mcdonald) July 3, 2019 8. Umm I bought Blue Bell ice cream a couple of days before that video went viral…. pic.twitter.com/sa8JLwTBtQ— Tay J (@tayDIOR) July 3, 2019 14. I’m gone laugh when all y’all that’s tonguing Blue Bell ice cream and putting it back on the shelfs go to jail for tampering with food products. pic.twitter.com/nC8492mvha— StarChild (@sj_shadrique) July 2, 2019 4. The executives at Blue Bell ice cream after seeing the video of the girl licking their product in the store: pic.twitter.com/6AdKZq5l6i— Wiley Coyote (@Fadedessence) June 30, 2019 20. Blue Bell should be seeking the ice cream licker’s social media accounts just to send them this from the brand page: pic.twitter.com/qHe1cQTJPN— Black Billy Bauer (@ThatDakari) July 2, 2019 25. Meanwhile, Haagen-Daz & other ice cream cos. that put protective film on top of carton looking at Blue Bell like… pic.twitter.com/qqIbk7C6fy— jujoffer (@jujoffer) July 2, 2019 15. I bet not ever catch someone licking on GOD’s blue bell Ice cream in the store! pic.twitter.com/UECWTrr2Nk— Valentino Blake (@ZillaMane41) July 2, 2019 13. How are the ice creams not sealed?!?! Lol blue bell needs to explain. pic.twitter.com/TWEkPfKR6u— bennie (@coolkidb__) July 2, 2019 6. A very insightful thread that you should read about the legal implications of that girl licking the carton of ice cream in the store and blue bell ice cream for having open containers. But just in case you can’t this gif sums it up perfectly. https://t.co/aAXsPZ2jx9 pic.twitter.com/WjAPaCQzI6— toomuch_tv_tony (@ToomuchTvTony) July 3, 2019 24. Y’all: “Damn, they charging the girl who licked the Blue Bell with a felony. They ain’t have to do that to a sista.”Y’all if ya found out you ate the ice cream she licked: pic.twitter.com/hcAziRBcut— jujoffer (@jujoffer) July 2, 2019 10. Question I need an answer to:Why doesn’t the blue bell ice cream have the plastic seal around the top of their containers?! #BlueBell pic.twitter.com/MQRuOwUNKc— cheryl trotter (@beyfierce91) July 3, 2019 2. Y’all going to be enjoying your 4th of July cookout and all of sudden be like this because your uncle bought some licked on ice cream. pic.twitter.com/EyEshFzdvH— Mrs. “W.W.C.D.” Drake (@tsddrake) July 2, 2019 FAIR WARNING: This is scariest horror film since the Exorcist — turn back now pic.twitter.com/DaAexVuxGA— (@Jason) October 29, 2018Still, the video has prompted what seems like all of social media to search for the culprit in an effort to bring her to justice for what they said was an unforgivable act that could compromise the health of an unwitting shopper. Scroll down to see some of the reactions on Twitter. How NOT to lick ice cream and put it back pic.twitter.com/ldBn2yBkcP— Mikezz (@TEE_Lipzz18) July 3, 2019Despite all the concerns, there was one consensus: It’s nasty.But there were also worries the video could invite copy-cats to start what could become the latest inane viral challenge. One subsequent video from an apparent clout-chaser sparked those concerns. 23. Who eats blue bell ice cream in 2019? pic.twitter.com/Vm5AC2Qair— Shēhuà (@comeupshuffle) July 2, 2019 26. The girl that licked that blue bell ice cream is getting charged pic.twitter.com/MGpGyPcd4i— Pio Fan Account (@UltraFlyKnits) July 2, 2019 11. Yall better start putting seals on your ice cream! No more blue bell for me until I see otherwise pic.twitter.com/WZAEi5WhJU— sista terri clarence (@Mediterranean_Z) July 3, 2019 The recent video showing a young woman who licked inside a tub of Blue Bell ice cream before putting it back in a supermarket freezer has resonated one way or another across social media, where users have reacted with strong feelings.READ MORE: Social Media Users Say They’ve ID’ed The Blue Bell Ice Cream LickerAs police were reportedly searching for the unidentified Black woman who may or may not have done her unsanitary deed in a grocery store in San Antonio, Texas, the disgusting footage prompted people to call for her to be prosecuted for what appeared to be a case of felony food tampering. Others said she was simply guilty of the latest example of what’s being called “clout-chasing,” or doing something on-camera for the sole purpose of going viral on the internet. Some people wondered why the gallon of Blue Bell ice cream in the video did not come sealed in order to prevent the possibility of the apparent food contamination that happened in the video.last_img read more

Thousands of scientists in Argentina strike to protest budget cuts

first_img Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Scientists from labs across Argentina stayed home today, joining a nationwide strike against the government’s latest round of austerity measures. One of their key rallying points: a call to restore lost opportunities for young researchers who began their education during a time of high investment in science but now have little hope of continuing their careers in Argentina.Schools, public transportation systems, and university offices shut down as their employees joined the strike, making it difficult to say exactly how many researchers were absent as part of the national movement. But research institute heads estimated thousands were on strike.Since coming to power in 2015, President Mauricio Macri’s administration has cut short efforts by his predecessors to grow the scientific community. In the latest blow, the National Scientific and Technical Research Council (CONICET), headquartered in Buenos Aires, announced on 5 April that it had a mere 450 new first-time investigator positions available for this year’s roughly 2600 Ph.D. graduates and former postdocs—leaving a record number of trainees without jobs. The previous government had projected that about 1400 new jobs would now be available. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Lindzi WesselApr. 30, 2019 , 4:00 PM Thousands of scientists in Argentina strike to protest budget cutscenter_img Natacha Pisarenko/AP PHOTO Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Marchers flooded the streets of Buenos Aires today to protest President Mauricio Macri’s austerity measures. Without a position with CONICET, which employs more than 20,000 researchers in hundreds of centers throughout the country, young scientists have few opportunities. And the salaries of those lucky enough to get a job this year will be worth roughly half as much as they were in 2015, because of a failure to raise research salaries in step with rapid inflation.CONICET institute directors themselves are fighting the cuts. On 12 April, 140 of them paid their own way to the city of Córdoba for an emergency meeting, in some cases despite phone calls from CONICET authorities discouraging participation, according to two attendees who requested anonymity. “This is a very brand-new forum,” says biological anthropologist Rolando González-José, an institute head at the National Patagonian Center (CENPAT) in Puerto Madryn. “The number of directors attending was significant evidence of the crisis we are facing right now.” (CONICET did not respond to emails from Science.)The meeting resulted in a manifesto demanding “the immediate implementation of a plan to rescue CONICET,” including a scholarship extension for the trainees who missed out on a job and are now scrambling for other opportunities. It also called for an emergency budget increase for CONICET and reinstitution of the nation’s science ministry, which downgraded to a subsection of the Ministry of Education last year. The group has yet to receive a response from the government.The plight of science reflects a broad economic crisis in Argentina, where massive inflation and a slipping peso have also forced other government agencies and private businesses to tighten their belts. The nation recently received a bailout package of more than $57 billion from the International Monetary Fund—the largest ever in the fund’s history—that comes with stiff requirements, including a commitment to cut the deficit to zero this year.The impact on science has already been dramatic. Investment in R&D was just 0.26% of gross domestic product in 2018, down from 0.53% just 3 years earlier. Many CONICET institutes have cut back on such basic needs as cleaning and security services, as well as on research operations. The Institute of Theoretical and Applied Physicochemistry Research in La Plata, for instance, can no longer supply its labs with critical resources such as liquid nitrogen and oxygen tanks. At CENPAT, field research vans that encounter mechanical issues must simply be retired; there’s no money for maintenance. The peso’s drop has made imported equipment and reagents virtually unaffordable. “You think 100 times before running an experiment and you pray it won’t fail,” says Juan Pablo Jaworski, a CONICET virologist at the National Institute of Agricultural Technology.To make matters worse, funding promised for some facilities is overdue, with no word on when or whether it will arrive. By the end of 2018, only 40% of 2017 funds had made it into the hands of institute directors. So far, this year’s funding has hovered around only half that amount.The dismal job prospects for young researchers are bound to accelerate Argentina’s brain drain, says Alberto Kornblihtt, head of CONICET’s Institute of Physiology, Molecular Biology, and Neurosciences. Kornblihtt recently saw two junior principal investigators leave his institute to find labs abroad after struggling to make ends meet for a year and not seeing much hope for improvement. “We can’t just say you don’t have any place in this country, go abroad,” he says. “We have to stop the brain drain and keep the system alive.”The protests will continue. CONICET directors are planning their own push for public support at a 22 May national cabildo abierto, or open council, a form of protest structured around the public debate. Yet González-José can’t help but feel pessimistic, because the scientific community has been ignored before. The resistance is getting stronger, he concedes, but “the resistance is getting stronger because the problems are getting worse.”last_img read more

Parliament Highlights Both Houses adjourned for the day will commence 11 am

first_img 13:07 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 facebook twitter whatsapp Union Home Minister Amit Shah said that the Narendra Modi-led government will never misuse the National Investigation Agency (NIA) law, but in turn, use it to finish off terrorism in the country.The Lower House also witnessed a heated discussion between the Home Minister and AIMIM chief Asaduddin Owaisi over the NIA (Amendment) Bill. The spat started when several opposition leaders, including Owaisi, started interrupting BJP’s Satyapal Singh in the middle of his speech. Singh alleged that the then Hyderabad Police Commissioner was threatened to be transferred if he did not change the course of the investigation of a particular case.Opposing his claim, Owaisi demanded that Singh should place all records related to his claim in the House. On this, the Home Minister got up from his seat and said that the treasury members did not disturb opposition members during their speeches so they should also do the same.Live BlogMonsoon session of Parliament resumed on Monday. Get latest updates here. 12:16 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 If you want good service, you have to pay: Nitin Gadkari on toll collection 13:01 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 16:05 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 Bengal chief secy asked to convene meeting of committee monitoring central schemes Lok Sabha Speaker Om Birla today said that he has asked the chief secretary of West Bengal to convene a meeting of a committee which monitors implementation of central schemes in states. Adhir Ranjan Chowdhury had recently complained that District Development Coordination and Monitoring Committee, also called Disha committee was not meeting regularly. The Speaker was responding to Chowdhury’s complaint. facebook twitter whatsapp Lok Sabha adjourned till tomorrow Lok Sabha has been adjourned for the day, will commence tomorrow at 11 am. facebook twitter whatsapp 12:01 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 ‘Will fight terrorism with zero tolerance’ While introducing the bill, Reddy said special court judges will continue to be appointed by the Chief Justice in order to fast-track the trial processes. He added that state governments must constitute special courts to tackle terrorism. “We will continue to fight terrorism with zero tolerance,” he said. facebook twitter whatsapp Proceedings resume in Rajya Sabha Proceedings have resumed in Rajya Sabha. 18:33 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 parliament, parliament live, parliament live today, lok sabha live, parliament monsoon session live, monsoon session live, monsoon session live today, parliament monsoon session, rajya sabha live, nia bill, nia amendment bill, live news, Indian Express Home Minister Amit Shah said that the Narendra Modi-led government will never misuse the National Investigation Agency (NIA) law. (PTI)Parliament Session 2019 Highlights: The Lok Sabha on Monday passed The National Investigation Agency (Amendment) Bill, 2019 which gives powers to the NIA to probe terror attacks targeting Indians and Indian interests abroad. facebook twitter whatsapp Congress gives Adjournment Motion Notice in Lok Sabha The Congress has given notice over the pension of disabled Army personnel. Adhir Ranjan Chowdhury opposes Motor Vehicles Bill Congress leader in Lok Sabha, Adhir Ranjan Chowdhury, also opposed the Motor Vehicles Bill, mainly clauses 33 and 17. However, he acknowledges that it has been overdue. 12:46 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 22:30 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 22:34 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 Rajya Sabha: Jairam Ramesh opposes construction of mega port complex in Chennai Congress’ Jairman Ramesh, while speaking in Rajya Sabha, asked the Environment and Forest Ministry to reject clearance to building of a mega port complex in North Chennai which, he said, poses danger to the fragile ecosystem in the region and livelihood of thousands of fishermen. 17:29 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 Neeraj Shekhar resigns from Rajya Sabha Samajwadi Party leader Neeraj Shekhar, son of former Prime Minister Chandrashekhar, resigns from Rajya Sabha. His resignation has been accepted by Chairman M Venkaiah Naidu.Samajwadi MP Neeraj Shekhar has resigned from RS. His resignation has been accepted by chairman @MVenkaiahNaidu @IndianExpress— abantika ghosh (@abantika77) July 15, 2019 facebook twitter whatsapp TMC MP Saugata Roy gives Adjournment Motion Notice in Lok Sabha Trinamool Congress MP Saugata Roy moved an Adjournment Motion in connection with the Kolkata metro incident in which a senior citizen was killed after his hand got stuck between the train doors. Lok Sabha passes NIA (Amendment) Bill Lok Sabha passes The National Investigation Agency (Amendment) Bill, 2019, giving powers to the NIA to probe terror attacks targeting Indians and Indian interests abroad. 13:04 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 facebook twitter whatsapp Rajya Sabha MPs want discussion on inter-linking of rivers Satyanarayan Jatiya (BJP) raised the issue of inter-linking of rivers to solve the problem of drought. A K Selvaraj (AIADMK) raised similar demand. facebook twitter whatsapp Lok Sabha discusses Demands for Grants under Ministry of Road Transport and Highways’s control Lok Sabha discusses the Demands for Grants under the control of the Ministry of Road Transport and Highways for 2019-20. 16:27 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 facebook twitter whatsapp facebook twitter whatsapp Lok Sabha discusses The National Investigation Agency (Amendment) Bill, 2019 The discussion on The National Investigation Agency (Amendment) Bill, 2019, started in the Lok Sabha. MoS G Kishan Reddy said that the bill is brought in the national interest to broaden the investigating powers of the NIA as part of its zero tolerance policy against terrorism. Meanwhile, Congress leader Manish Tewari accused the government of trying to turn India into a “police state.” 13:47 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 ‘Loot by airlines’: CPM on price hike in airfares CPM’s K K Ragesh demanded roll back in steep hike in airfares in the Kerala-Gulf sector which, he said, was a “loot” by airlines by exploiting migrant workers. While the Calicut-Dubai flight costs Rs 6,000, a Dubai to Calicut flight costs Rs 40,000, he said, adding airfares are jacked up during festive seasons and holidays when migrant workers seek to return to their hometown. facebook twitter whatsapp 13:26 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 14:07 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 14:10 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 facebook twitter whatsapp facebook twitter whatsapp Rajya Sabha adjourned for the day Rajya Sabha has been adjourned for the day, will commence tomorrow at 11am. facebook twitter whatsapp 14:02 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 16:07 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 TMC’s Mahua Moitra opposes Motor Vehicles Bill In Lok Sabha, TMC’s Mahua Moitra opposes the Motors Vehicle Bill on grounds that it provides the public an extension period from a month to a year upon the expiry of driving license, thereby raising questions over one’s safety. facebook twitter whatsapp Rajya Sabha: Vijayasai Reddy speaks on fishermen languishing in Pakistan jail Raising the issue of fishermen languishing in Pakistan jails, V Vijayasai Reddy (YSR-Congress), in Rajya Sabha, said 46 fishermen were captured by Pakistan maritime security agency in October-November last year after illegally entering into Indian waters. According to Pakistan, as many as 483 fishermen are languishing in its jails, he said, adding 22 out of the 46 fishermen captured in October/November 2018 were from Andhra Pradesh who had gone to Gujarat for working on fishing trawlers. “What was the Indian Coast Guard doing when Pakistan intruded into Indian waters,” he asked. He said when the issue was first raised, the then External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj had promised to get consular access. “But neither the fishermen were released nor consular access given to families,” he said, asking the Government to urgently intervene to get families consular access. 12:08 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 Rajya Sabha BJP member suggests one nation, one electricity tariff Earlier in the day, BJP Rajya Sabha member Swait Malik suggested uniform electricity tariffs across the country to ensure affordable power for all. Raising the issue during the Zero Hour in the House, he highlighted that power tariffs varies across states. He said while one has to pay Rs 8 per unit of electricity in Punjab, consumers in neighbouring states of Himachal Pradesh and Jammu and Kashmir were paying much less. Malik said because of high power tariff, poor people in Punjab are forced to switch off appliances like fan to save money. He also said that industrial units were migrating from the state due to high cost of power. The BJP member said like GST, one nation one tax, there should be ‘one nation, one electricity tariff’. Assam Congress MPs protest against flood situation outside Parliament Assam Congress MPs today staged a protest in front of the Gandhi statue in Parliament over the flood situation in the state and demanded that the flood situation be declared a national problem.Delhi: Assam Congress MPs protest in front of Gandhi statue in Parliament over flood situation in the state and demand Assam floods to be declared a National Problem pic.twitter.com/FYZTQSfUMx— ANI (@ANI) July 15, 2019 10 Comment(s) 12:53 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 facebook twitter whatsapp facebook twitter whatsapp 13:19 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 ‘Terrorism not a political issue’: BJP’s Satya Pal Singh MP from Baghpat in UP, Satya Pal Singh, said, “Terrorism is a serious crime against humanity. It cannot be treated as a political issue. When we discuss terrorism and laws to tackle it, we should be totally apolitical.”  facebook twitter whatsapp 12:00 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 12:33 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 12:58 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 13:05 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 17:42 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 facebook twitter whatsapp Discussion on working of Ministry of Ayurveda underway in RS A discussion on the working of Ministry of Ayurveda, Yoga and Naturopathy, Unani, Sidhha, and Homeopathy (Ayush) underway in the Rajya Sabha. Lok Sabha passes bill to strengthen NIA The Lok Sabha on Monday passed the National Investigation Agency (Amendment) Bill, 2019, which will empower the agency to probe terror attacks targeting Indians and Indian interests on foreign soil. During a discussion on the NIA (Amendment) Bill, 2019, Union Home Minister Amit Shah countered opposition claims over “misuse” of the NIA law. He asserted that the Narendra Modi-led government will never misuse it on the basis of religion and said instead it will ensure the menace of terrorism is uprooted irrespective of the religion of the guilty. Read more Heavy rains outside the Parliament Heavy rains lashed the Parliament premises on Monday eveningWATCH | Heavy rains lash Delhi, bring respite from hot weather conditions pic.twitter.com/AiVJoBSTsb— The Indian Express (@IndianExpress) July 15, 2019 facebook twitter whatsapp 17:52 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 facebook twitter whatsapp facebook twitter whatsapp facebook twitter whatsapp By Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Updated: July 15, 2019 10:37:42 pm 14:03 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 facebook twitter whatsapp Assam floods: Congress MP gives Zero Hour notice in Rajya Sabha Congress MP and Assam Congress Committee President Ripun Bora gave a Zero Hour notice in Rajya Sabha over the flood situation in the north-eastern state.Congress MP and Assam Congress Committee President Ripun Bora has given Zero Hour Notice in Rajya Sabha over flood situation in Assam. pic.twitter.com/SUzMFfQuiq— ANI (@ANI) July 15, 2019 facebook twitter whatsapp facebook twitter whatsapp facebook twitter whatsapp 12:40 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 facebook twitter whatsapp 11:56 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 15:19 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 facebook twitter whatsapp Congress raises questions over validity of NIA Act Opposing the Bill, Congress’ Manish Tewari told those gathered in the Lok Sabha, “The NIA Bill, in 2008, came under specific circumstances after the country felt some unprecedented incidents. The constitutional validity of the NIA Act is not settled as of now. The Bombay High Court had upheld the constitutional validity of the act. The J&K court has not yet given its approval. In November 2013, a division bench of Gauhati High Court had spoken of the ‘illegal organisation’.” Parliament resumes after two-day break Both Houses of Parliament resumed on Monday. After failing to get it through Rajya Sabha in the previous term, the Narendra Modi-government is slated to introduce the Motor Vehicles (Amendment) Bill, 2019, in Lok Sabha on Monday. The Bill, which will be introduced by Union Minister Nitin Gadkari, proposes stricter punishment for traffic violations, simplify vehicle registration process, and overhaul the traffic and transport regulatory framework in India with a view to minimise road accidents. Follow this space for all the latest updates. ‘Why is Bengal govt targetted’: TMC MP Sudipto Sen in Lok Sabha Addressing the Lok Sabha, TMC MP Sudipto Sen said, “Why is Bengal government getting targetted? Why is the central government sending its advisories to Bengal?” facebook twitter whatsapp Related News Rajnath Singh speaks in Rajya Sabha Union Defence Minister Rajnath Singh is addressing the Upper House.  National Investigation Agency Amendment Bill tabled in Lok Sabha National Investigation Agency Amendment Bill was introduced by Home Minister (MoS) G Kishan Reddy in Lok Sabha. “This Bill is for the security of the country,” he said. facebook twitter whatsapp Demand to raise royalty on coal in Rajya Sabha Demands to raise royalty on coal, roll back of steep hike in airfares between Kerala and Gulf region and government intervention to help release fishermen captured by Pakistan were among issues raised during the Zero Hour in Rajya Sabha today. BJD’s Amar Patnaik said the rate of royalty paid to state governments on coal produced in states was last changed in April 2012 and as per rule was due to be revised in April 2015 but was not done. facebook twitter whatsapp Advertising TMC’s Shanta Chhetri raises Kolkata metro incident in Rajya Sabha Addressing the Upper House, TMC’s Shanta Chhetri raised the issue of death of a person after his hand got stuck between two sliding doors of the Kolkata Metro on Saturday last. She alleged passenger safety was being compromised with by the Railway Ministry and demanded immediate allocation of funds for proper maintenance and upgrade of the metro rail. 12:28 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 13:34 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 12:05 (IST) 15 Jul 2019 Rain lashes Parliament premises Heavy rain lashed the Parliament premisesExpress photo by Renuka Puri facebook twitter whatsapp Govt can’t do away with tolls, pay for good services: Nitin Gadkari Congress raises issue of illegal mining in Rajya Sabha In his Zero Hour mention, Congress’ P Bhattacharya talked about illegal coal mining in the country and demanded a CBI inquiry to find out people behind such activities. He said many labourers work in illegal mines and they do not even get compensation. Rajya Sabha adjourned till 2 pm Rajya Sabha was adjourned till 2 pm after the Question Hour was over. facebook twitter whatsapp Explained: What the government intends to do to improve road safety? last_img read more

Bacterial therapy shows early clinical efficacy in patients with treatmentrefractory solid tumors

first_img Source:https://www.aacr.org/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 30 2018A phase I clinical trial investigating the use of bacterial Clostridium novyi-NT spores as an injectable monotherapy had manageable toxicities and showed early clinical efficacy in patients with treatment-refractory solid tumor malignancies, according to data presented at the Fourth CRI-CIMT-EATI-AACR International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference: Translating Science into Survival, held Sept. 30-Oct. 3.”Even after a single injection of this bacterial therapy, we see biological and, in some patients, clinically meaningful activity,” said Filip Janku, MD, PhD, associate professor at the Department of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics (Phase I Clinical Trial Program), The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston. “This strategy is feasible, has manageable adverse effects, and could be clinically meaningful in patients with few therapeutic options.”While prior anticancer therapies have utilized bacteria, these treatments can cause infection and severe side effects, explained Janku. C. novyi-NT is an attenuated bacterium that requires a hypoxic environment, a feature of cancerous lesions, to survive and proliferate and therefore does not affect healthy cells, he noted. “By exploiting the inherent differences between healthy and cancerous tissue, C. novyi-NT represents a very precise anticancer therapeutic that can specifically attack a patient’s cancer,” Janku said.Janku and colleagues evaluated the intratumoral injection of C. novyi-NT spores in an open-label, first-in-human study. Between November 2013 and April 2017, the researchers enrolled 24 patients with treatment-refractory solid tumors, with 15 patients having sarcoma, seven patients having diverse carcinoma, and two patients having melanoma.Tumors were injected with a single dose of C. novyi-NT ranging from 10,000 to 3 million spores. Two patients treated with 3 million spores displayed dose-limiting toxicities of grade 4 sepsis and/or grade 4 gas gangrene; the maximum tolerated dose was therefore determined to be 1 million spores.Of the 22 evaluable patients, 21 had stable disease as measured by RECIST for the injected lesion, with tumor shrinkage of greater than 10 percent observed in 23 percent of patients. When both injected and uninjected lesions were included, the stable disease rate was 86 percent.Related StoriesManuka honey could be useful in treating cystic fibrosis lung infectionAI-enabled device detects if targeted chemotherapy is workingNovel vaccine against bee sting allergy successfully testedJanku noted that RECIST criteria may not accurately capture the results of this trial. “When we inject the tumor, the cells within it die and become necrotic while the remaining tissue becomes inflamed, making the lesion larger in size than the original tumor. Because of this, evaluation via RECIST does not accurately reflect the reduction in tumor burden in these patients.”Janku and colleagues also evaluated the germination of the bacterial spores through clinical and radiological methods. Of the 24 patients enrolled in the trial, tumors from 46 percent displayed spore germination and resultant tumor cell lysis.”Despite the absence of clinical signs of germination in some patients, we saw improved tumor-specific immune responses through the increased secretion of T-cell cytokines and increased presence of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in injected tumors,” noted Janku. “From these preliminary results, it appears that C. novyi-NT is able to activate the immune response besides causing tumor destruction.”Because C. novyi-NT elicits an innate immune response, Janku believes that this therapy will be synergistic with checkpoint inhibition. The results from this study have led to the initiation of a phase I clinical trial investigating the combination of C. novyi-NT with pembrolizumab (Keytruda).”We were extremely encouraged by the results of this trial, especially in patients with advanced sarcomas, where immunotherapy hasn’t proven very efficacious,” Janku said. “This bacteriolytic strategy has the potential to be clinically meaningful, especially in combination with checkpoint inhibitors, for patients with advanced solid tumors.”Limitations of this study include a short follow-up time for some patients, as many entered into other clinical trials if they became available.last_img read more

Study explains why women are more prone to Alzheimers disease

first_imgThe study could help to explain why around two-thirds of dementia patients are female, a fact that has previously been attributed to women living longer than men and having more time to develop the condition. However, many scientists suspected that other mechanisms may be contributing to the gender gap in Alzheimer’s prevalence.The current study looked specifically at tau deposits in the brains of patients aged an average of 74 years who were all cognitively healthy. Women showed more tau in a region of the brain than men, which was associated with individuals with greater amounts of plaque deposits of the beta-amyloid peptide, another marker of Alzheimer’s.”Dr. Reisa Sperling, Lead Author By Sally Robertson, B.Sc.Feb 5 2019Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have shed light on why women are more prone to developing Alzheimer’s than men.Carla Francesca Castagno | ShutterstockA study of 300 elderly individuals who underwent PET (positron emission tomography) scans showed that women are more likely to develop the toxic proteins known to trigger the disease.As reported in the journal JAMA Neurology, the scans revealed that men had fewer of the disease-causing tau and beta-amyloid deposits in their brains than women did.These proteins are present in all grey matter, but when large amounts of them aggregate to form tangles or clumps, this can destroy neurons and lead to memory loss and confusion seen in Alzheimer’s. Growing evidence suggests women may be at increased risk of certain physiological changes associated with Alzheimer’s disease.”Dr. Reisa Sperling, Lead Authorcenter_img These findings lend support to a growing body of literature that exposes a biological underpinning for sex differences in Alzheimer’s disease risk.”Dr. Reisa Sperling, Lead Author Researchers previously thought that there were no significant differences in the brain levels of these protein “biomarkers” between men and women, but potential gender-specific differences involved in the pathology of the disease is becoming an increasingly important focus in Alzheimer’s research.Sperling says the current findings support other studies in identifying potential reasons for the differences in risk for Alzheimer’s disease between men and women.Previous research has shown that women genetically predisposed to Alzheimer’s have higher levels of tau in their cerebrospinal fluid than predisposed men and the current study is the first to identify a similar pattern in clinically healthy individuals.last_img read more

Molecular target UNC45A is essential for cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth

first_img Source:http://www.augusta.edu/mcg/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 19 2019Identifying a protein that plays a key role in cancer cell growth is a first step toward the development of a targeted cancer therapy. It is especially promising when this protein is dispensable for the growth of normal cells. Their discovery that UNC45A fits these criteria has researchers, led by Dr. Ahmed Chadli, of the Georgia Cancer Center at Augusta University, excited about potential new cancer therapeutic strategies involving the inhibition of UNC45A.UNC45A has long been recognized as a molecular chaperone, responsible for helping other proteins reach their functional state by guiding protein folding. It has a distinct role in cancer, however, where its over-expression in breast and ovarian cancer patient tissues correlates with grade and stage of the disease. After confirming that UNC45A is not required for the proliferation of normal breast cells, Dr. Chadli’s group showed that in both cell and mouse models of breast cancer, UNC45A is required for cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth.Related StoriesTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerLiving with advanced breast cancerNanoparticles used to deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cellThey published the underlying molecular mechanism in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, first by demonstrating that when they silenced UNC45A expression, an enzyme called NEK7 was also down-regulated, by 2-fold. NEK7 plays a key role in cell proliferation by orchestrating the proper separation of chromosomes during cell division. Either silencing UNC45A or deleting NEK7 resulted in decreased cancer cell proliferation, and adding NEK7 to UNC45A-silenced cells restored proliferative capacity.Examining normal versus cancer cell lines and normal versus cancerous human breast tissues, the researchers observed significantly more UNC45A present inside (versus outside) of a cell’s nucleus. They further discovered that in the nucleus, UNC45A interacts with a protein called the glucocorticoid receptor that, in turn, promotes NEK7 expression.Due to NEK7’s key role in cell division, they further explored the effect of silenced UNC45A on cell replication. Importantly, they found that silencing UNC45A, which results in NEK7 down-regulation, caused the cancer cells to undergo what is known as mitotic catastrophe and die, exemplifying the ultimate therapeutic goal.This result was captured in a dramatic set of real-time videos of cell division in normal versus UNC45A-deficient cells. In normal cells (Movie 1), nuclear material, pictured in green, divides to form two separate cells, each surrounded by a cell membrane, which appears white. In UNC45A-deficient cells, (Movie 2), the nuclear material struggles to divide, and the division into two cells fails.”Inhibiting UNC45A holds tremendous potential in the fight against solid tumors, since its role in proliferation does not seem to be necessary for the survival of normal cells,” said Dr. Chadli. “How to inhibit its tumoral role apart from its normal functions is the topic of future studies that would improve our understanding of this molecular machine and how to harness its potential clinical application.”last_img read more